Making America Home: one unaccompanied minor’s journey from San Salvador to Queens.

HOST INTRO: During the 2014 migration crisis, thousands of Central-American children streamed across the border alone. Now President Donald Trump says he’s attempting to crack down on these children’s path to legality. One young man, who crossed border when he was 14 years old, had few options. That is, until someone reached out to help. […]

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Muslim Women Reclaiming Hijabs Post-Inauguration


In New York City, Muslim women have become front-and-center of the anti-Trump resistance. They’re organizing protests. Speaking at rallies. And doing work behind-the-scenes. For many of them, it’s become a moment to break down stereotypes–both in their public and private lives. And one way they’re doing this is by reclaiming a symbol that’s often misunderstood in this country: the hijab. Meg Dalton reports.

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New York City Cubans Reflect on Castro’s Death

More than a week ago, Cuban revolutionary Fidel Castro passed away at the age of 90. While the island’s inhabitants tearfully mourned their leader, exiled Cuban communities in the US celebrated the death of a dictator. In Miami, residents took to Little Havana’s streets crying tears of joy, singing, banging pans and waving their flags. But New York, where more than seventy thousand residents are Cuban, saw mixed reactions. Danya Hajjaji has the story.

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Unaccompanied Child Migrants Face Court Alone

Two years ago, President Obama made the decision to fast-track deportation cases. It has forced many unaccompanied child migrants — some as young as four — to face immigration court without an attorney. New York City is unique, because a coalition of nonprofits called ICARE has been working together since then to provide legal services for free. But with the Department of Homeland Security doubling down on arrest and raids since early March, is ICARE a sufficient solution to the humanitarian crisis? Henriette Chacar reports.

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NY State Senate Bills Challenge Freedom of Speech

Israeli Apartheid Week is taking place on campuses across the world, including Columbia University’s as of Monday. One of the event’s central goals is to garner support for the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, known more commonly as BDS. This nonviolent initiative is modeled after the 1980s campaign against apartheid in South Africa — but is directed at Israel and its treatment of Palestinians. The BDS movement is in its 11th year, but still stirs controversy. Now, the debate has reached the New York State Senate. Henriette Chacar reports.

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“Tech-fugees” Seek Hi-Tech Solutions To Migrant Crisis

While much of Europe is struggling with the current Syrian refugee crisis, Calais – a city in Northern France – has been dealing with a migrant population since the late 1990s. Now, a group of civic minded technology and design people are using this community as a way to try out some ideas of how to make lives for refugees a little safer. Adele Humbert reports.

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Ex-Offenders Face Barriers to College


Ex-convicts who get a college degree are less likely to go back to prison. But many former prisoners encounter a big obstacle in the college application process. That’s because some colleges are worried about the effects of having felons on campus. Not all universities ask about a criminal records, but all 64 institutions in the State University of New York system do.

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A Solitary Fight


On any given day, there are about 4,000 inmates in solitary confinement in New York State. And people can be kept there for years.
The United Nations says any time in solitary beyond 15 days is torture. And the Vera Institute — a justice policy nonprofit — says it’s just inhumane. The institute is launching a new initiative to reduce solitary confinement use in New York City.

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Wikimedia Files Suit Against NSA


This Wednesday, Wikimedia and eight other organizations sued the NSA. The lawsuit challenges the agency’s widespread use of mass surveillance online. I spoke with Michelle Paulson, senior legal counsel for Wikimedia, about how they believe the NSA’s program is damaging to privacy and even freedom.

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