Tackling Diversity in a Majority White Connecticut Suburb

The affluent New York City suburb of Westport, Connecticut is 97 percent white. The annual high school essay contest chose the topic of white privilege. The diversity council made national news for a high school essay contest on white privilege – uprooting the council’s quiet existence and questioning the purpose of diversity organizations. Some community members say it’s just what the town needs. Emily Dugdale has the story.

Read More

The Bachelorette Gets a Black Contestant, Finally

ABC’s The Bachelor and Bachelorette is one of the network’s most popular shows, according to Nielsen ratings. This week, the network announced that its next bachelorette, Rachel Linsday, will be a black woman—the first in the show’s twenty-two-season history. The decision to cast her has gotten a lot of positive press. But Yesha Callahan, senior editor at The Root, isn’t so sure. I asked with her about the cultural implications, and, why the move has taken this long.

Read More

Harlem Residents Face 3-Month Gas Drought, New York’s Crumbling Gas Lines

The deadly gas explosion in East Harlem three years ago represented a worst case scenario. Con Edison’s settlement of more than $150 million with New York signals an increased city-wide focus on gas leaks. One residential building in West Harlem has been without gas since November, after one call led to extreme precaution. Hannah Long-Higgins has the story.

Read More

ConEd and State Reach Settlement in East Harlem Gas Explosion

Three years ago, a Con Edison gas leak explosion rocked East Harlem, destroying two 6 story buildings, killing 8 people, and injuring 50 more. Last night, ConEdison and the New York Public Service Commision in Albany came to a settlement: ConEdison will pay 153.3 million dollars to the state to cover the damage and repay former residents at the site of the blast. Our reporter Sarah Gibson talked with locals about what the settlement could mean for them.

Read More

Racially Charged Books Send Booksellers Soul-Searching


The American political division has become extreme. You can even see it in places like the Amazon bestseller’s list. Recently topping the list: 1984, the dystopian novel of a totalitarian political regime, and Dangerous, the upcoming memoir by former Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos. When Simon & Schuster announced it had acquired the rights to Yiannopoulos’ book, there was an immediate firestorm. Bestselling author Roxane Gay cut ties with the imprint and the Chicago Review of Books declared it wouldn’t review any Simon & Schuster books for as long as it worked with the author. Rebecca Scott has more on how the publishing industry caters to a divided America as an industry that relies on the patron dollars of both.

Read More

The Implications of Trump’s War on Journalists


In an unprecedented move for any U.S. President, Trump’s administration sent out an email on Thursday asking his supporters to take a Media Accountability Survey. The survey asks questions like, “Do you trust CNN to report fairly on Trump’s presidency?” And “Do you believe that our party should spend more time and resources holding the mainstream media accountable?” Some might remember that Trump sent a similar poll in August as a presidential candidate – but it’s the first of its kind from an acting president. Today Emily Dugdale spoke with Fred Blevins, who teaches media and law at Florida International University to talk about where this leaves journalists.

Read More

Muslim Women Reclaiming Hijabs Post-Inauguration


In New York City, Muslim women have become front-and-center of the anti-Trump resistance. They’re organizing protests. Speaking at rallies. And doing work behind-the-scenes. For many of them, it’s become a moment to break down stereotypes–both in their public and private lives. And one way they’re doing this is by reclaiming a symbol that’s often misunderstood in this country: the hijab. Meg Dalton reports.

Read More