Uptown Radio – March 4, 2016 – Full Broadcast


This week on Uptown Radio, a city-wide debate over the closing of Rikers Island has escalated. A group of protesters leads the conversation in front of City Hall. Yesterday marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the beating of Rodney King by four LA police officers, and a new report shows police misconduct still unequally impacts communities of color. The Federal Aviation Administration is buckling down on their air space regulations, which can mean bad news for drone owners. And we catch up with the first morning commuters at Ground Zero’s brand new Oculus.

Read More

New World Trade Center Transit Hub Opens in Lower Manhattan


The new World Trade Center Transit Hub officially opened yesterday afternoon, to mixed reviews. The structure cost the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey about four billion dollars. And it took five years longer than expected to build. Erin Golackson caught up with the first morning commuters as they passed through the hub today.

Read More

Protest Group Demands Closing Rikers Island


The debate over Rikers Island has escalated in the past two weeks. City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito [vee-va-REE-toe] has called for the gradual closure of the city jail on the East River, and Governor Andrew Cuomo has backed her. Mayor Bill De Blasio and New York City Police Commissioner Bill Bratton have dismissed the idea. But amid the political fights, Oliver Arnoldi finds an emerging group who are leading the conversation from the ground.

Read More

City Struggling With Rising Sea Levels


New Yorkers who experienced intense flooding during and after Hurricane Sandy have been seeing more flooding during ordinary weather events. According to new research published last week, sea levels are rising at a faster rate than ever before. While the city has taken steps to protect critical infrastructure, Nina Agrawal found out that it hasn’t done quite as much in residential areas.

Read More

In Gerritsen Beach, Residents Await Post-Sandy Assistance


It’s been over three years since Superstorm Sandy. But in some neighborhoods houses remain damaged and many owners can’t move back in because of on-going repairs. Repairs that some Brooklyn residents say should have been done a long time ago, but have been held up by poor city management and red tape. Tyler Pratt reports from Gerritsen Beach.

Read More

With Trump as Frontrunner, What’s Next for the GOP?


This has been a major week for the Republican party. Donald Trump was able to confirm his position as frontrunner in the party’s presidential primaries. At the same time, establishment Republicans have voiced their concerns about Trump’s candidacy.

I spoke with Thomas Whalen, Associate Professor of Social Sciences at Boston University. He shared his biggest takeaways from this week.

Read More

25 Years After Rodney King, A Look At Race in the United States


On March 3rd, 1991, Los Angeles police were filmed brutally beating an African American during an arrest. His name was Rodney King. The video caused widespread outrage, and led to the LA riots a year later.

To mark the 25th anniversary of this turning point in race relations in the country, I spoke with Melina Abdullah, a Professor of African-American studies at California State University. She still remembers when she first heard the news.

Read More

Report Finds Improper NYPD Searches Impact Minority Communities


It was 25 years ago that the graphic video of four LA police officers assaulting Rodney King shocked the nation and put police brutality at the forefront of conversations about race. In New York City, a new report this week focused on one abuse that’s still disproportionately affecting African Americans. Katie Ferguson has more.

Read More

Independent Artists Stage Fair


It’s a big week for art lovers – the biggest art fair in New York – the Armory Show, opened yesterday. It’s a showcase for more than 200 art galleries from around the world who put their artists in the show. But it doesn’t feature art by artists who don’t have a gallery representing them. Those independent artists are having an art fair of their own. Åsa Secher reports.

Read More

Officials Call for Expansion of Summer Jobs Program


Every year around this time, tens of thousands of New York teenagers enter the lottery. And no, I’m not talking about Powerball. Instead, it’s the Summer Youth Employment Program. Applications for the city-funded internship program opened this week. And if this year’s lottery is like the last, over half the young adults who apply won’t get in. Now though, a growing chorus of advocates and city officials are working to change that. Adrian Ma has the details.

Read More

Manhattan’s First Movie Theater in a Decade


Big-box theaters are getting bigger. AMC Entertainment announced today it will acquire Carmike Cinemas and form the country’s largest movie-theater chain — that’s more than six-hundred theaters.

But the independent theater industry is also celebrating a win — at least in New York. The Metrograph will be the first one to open in Manhattan in over a decade. Suzie Xie reports from the Lower East Side.

Read More