First HIV to HIV organ transplant successful in the U.S.

  Host Intro: This week, doctors at John Hopkins University successfully performed an organ transplant between HIV-positive patients. It’s the first time such a procedure is performed in the United States. Up until 2013 people who were HIV-positive were banned from donating their organs. To get more details on the importance of this operation, I […]

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Helicopter Tours Get Chopped

Normally, tourists hoping to get an ariel view of the city skyline can catch a ride on a helicopter tour. But starting this weekend, the choppers will be barred from flying on Sundays. It’s part of deal the city struck with tour operators to cut flights in half by next year. And while the city says it’s a compromise between local residents and business, Adrian Ma explains why no party involved is buzzing with enthusiasm over the deal.

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Unaccompanied Child Migrants Face Court Alone

Two years ago, President Obama made the decision to fast-track deportation cases. It has forced many unaccompanied child migrants — some as young as four — to face immigration court without an attorney. New York City is unique, because a coalition of nonprofits called ICARE has been working together since then to provide legal services for free. But with the Department of Homeland Security doubling down on arrest and raids since early March, is ICARE a sufficient solution to the humanitarian crisis? Henriette Chacar reports.

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Rolling Stones Rock Cuba

Several hours from now, the Rolling Stones will take the stage – in Havana, Cuba. It will be the biggest rock show the country’s seen since communists took over in 1959. More than a half-million people are expected to attend and it’ll be projected on 10 jumbo screens. All a big deal in a country that once banned Rock ‘n Roll. The concert marks the end of a historic week for U.S.- Cuba relations. Tim Padgett covers Latin America for WLRN, a public radio station in Miami. He just got back from Cuba.

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SESIS Gives Teachers Headaches and Costs City Millions

Last month the City’s Department of Education found that 40% of the its over 100,000 special needs students are not getting services that are required by state law. And now… a lawsuit filed by Public Advocate Letitia James argues that part of the blame lies with SESIS, the DOE’s 130 million dollar data system. Gilda Di Carli reports.

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Debate Over Do-It-Yourself Gene Editing

Cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats – CRISPR. It’s a mouthful, and a new scientific technique. In English, it’s like a new kind of scissor one that allows scientists to precisely correct mutations in a genome – like a cut and paste tool for DNA. Now, two big labs – one from Harvard and MIT and another from Berkeley – are fighting over the patent for the technology. But in the meantime, it’s already being used by the do-it-yourself community. And as Åsa Secher reports, that raises concerns about putting powerful scientific tools in the hands of lay people.

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