The Bachelorette Gets a Black Contestant, Finally

ABC’s The Bachelor and Bachelorette is one of the network’s most popular shows, according to Nielsen ratings. This week, the network announced that its next bachelorette, Rachel Linsday, will be a black woman—the first in the show’s twenty-two-season history. The decision to cast her has gotten a lot of positive press. But Yesha Callahan, senior editor at The Root, isn’t so sure. I asked with her about the cultural implications, and, why the move has taken this long.

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Racially Charged Books Send Booksellers Soul-Searching


The American political division has become extreme. You can even see it in places like the Amazon bestseller’s list. Recently topping the list: 1984, the dystopian novel of a totalitarian political regime, and Dangerous, the upcoming memoir by former Breitbart writer Milo Yiannopoulos. When Simon & Schuster announced it had acquired the rights to Yiannopoulos’ book, there was an immediate firestorm. Bestselling author Roxane Gay cut ties with the imprint and the Chicago Review of Books declared it wouldn’t review any Simon & Schuster books for as long as it worked with the author. Rebecca Scott has more on how the publishing industry caters to a divided America as an industry that relies on the patron dollars of both.

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Amnesty International and The Raging Grannies Protest President Trump

Yesterday, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in California rejected President Trump’s efforts to lift his travel ban from seven majority-muslim countries. The judges on the case challenged Trump’s claim that the courts should stay out of the process, and ruled that there was no immediate threat to national security to warrant the ban.But Trump has vowed to keep fighting. And so have a slew of human rights organizations. Rebecca Scott brings us this story from a protest today in midtown Manhattan.

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