Newscast I

Indictments and guilty pleas in the George Washington Bridge closure scandal; protestors in New York respond to the charges filed in Baltimore against six police officers in the death of Freddie Gray; the Whitney Museum reopens in the Meatpacking District; and “Stand By Me” singer Ben E. Keith dies at 76.

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A Four-Legged Solution for PTSD?

About one in five veterans of the Iraq war has post traumatic stress disorder. The federal government and many private insurers pay for traditional, evidence-based treatments, like talk therapy and medication. But some vets find relief in alternative therapies, that veterans’ benefits don’t pay for. One of those is working with horses.

A bill headed for congress would evaluate how effective these therapies are in treating PTSD. And a new program in New York is working to bring equine-assisted therapy to more veterans in the city. Miriam Sitz reports.

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McDonald’s, Minimum Wage and the March Jobs Report


The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the March jobs report this morning, revealing a slowdown in hiring much larger than anticipated. Only 126,000 jobs were added — about half of what economists were predicted. The good news is hourly earnings rose slightly, beating expectations. That indicates the labor market is tightening — to attract employees, businesses have to pay more. Today, Miriam Sitz started her morning at a restaurant in Harlem to see how jobs report numbers play out in real life. She went to McDonald’s on 125th and Broadway.

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Wikimedia Files Suit Against NSA


This Wednesday, Wikimedia and eight other organizations sued the NSA. The lawsuit challenges the agency’s widespread use of mass surveillance online. I spoke with Michelle Paulson, senior legal counsel for Wikimedia, about how they believe the NSA’s program is damaging to privacy and even freedom.

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DSCOVR Satellite Will Warn of Incoming Solar Storms


Solar winds are incredibly powerful bursts of high energy particles, and when they explode toward earth, they can do major damage to electronic systems — especially if there’s no advanced warning. A new satellite called DSCOVR is on its way to a lookout point in space. From there, it’ll send data back to earth, giving us a heads up about solar weather events heading our way.

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