SESIS Gives Teachers Headaches and Costs City Millions

Last month the City’s Department of Education found that 40% of the its over 100,000 special needs students are not getting services that are required by state law. And now… a lawsuit filed by Public Advocate Letitia James argues that part of the blame lies with SESIS, the DOE’s 130 million dollar data system. Gilda Di Carli reports.

Read More

Uptown Radio – March 25, 2016 – Full Broadcast

This week on Uptown Radio. Nearly two years after a surge in unaccompanied child migrants to the U.S., courts are still backlogged. A new gene editing technology is available, but a fight over ethics is dividing the scientific community. New York City is increasingly banning Hoverboards – they can be fun – but also cause fires and falls. And critics say a new law discriminates against the LGBT community. All that and more on Uptown Radio

Read More

Debate Over Do-It-Yourself Gene Editing

Cluster regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats – CRISPR. It’s a mouthful, and a new scientific technique. In English, it’s like a new kind of scissor one that allows scientists to precisely correct mutations in a genome – like a cut and paste tool for DNA. Now, two big labs – one from Harvard and MIT and another from Berkeley – are fighting over the patent for the technology. But in the meantime, it’s already being used by the do-it-yourself community. And as Åsa Secher reports, that raises concerns about putting powerful scientific tools in the hands of lay people.

Read More

Rolling Stones Rock Cuba

Several hours from now, the Rolling Stones will take the stage – in Havana, Cuba. It will be the biggest rock show the country’s seen since communists took over in 1959. More than a half-million people are expected to attend and it’ll be projected on 10 jumbo screens. All a big deal in a country that once banned Rock ‘n Roll. The concert marks the end of a historic week for U.S.- Cuba relations. Tim Padgett covers Latin America for WLRN, a public radio station in Miami. He just got back from Cuba.

Read More

Unaccompanied Child Migrants Face Court Alone

Two years ago, President Obama made the decision to fast-track deportation cases. It has forced many unaccompanied child migrants — some as young as four — to face immigration court without an attorney. New York City is unique, because a coalition of nonprofits called ICARE has been working together since then to provide legal services for free. But with the Department of Homeland Security doubling down on arrest and raids since early March, is ICARE a sufficient solution to the humanitarian crisis? Henriette Chacar reports.

Read More

Strong Showing from Minority Voters Expected at the Polls

Today is the last day for New Yorkers to register to vote in the presidential primaries. And New Yorkers are registering in droves. The State’s online voter registration system is experiencing a surge in applications, in just 10 days, over 40,000 people registered to vote online, half of which were first time voters. As Alison Vicrobeck reports, Donald Trump’s controversial candidacy is pushing more minority and female voters to sign up.

Read More

Effects of Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Still Felt 105 Years Later

On Wednesday, hundreds gathered on lower Manhattan to pay tribute to the 146 workers who died in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire. The fire – which took place 105 years ago today – was the worst industrial disaster in the history of the city. Today, 90 teams of artists are drawing chalk figures on sidewalks with details of each worker who died in the fire. As Elizabeth Brockway reports, people at both events says the effects of that fire are still being felt today.

Read More